News and Updates

News and Updates

Anderson Manufacturing is the Third Largest Rifle Manufacturer

Anderson Manufacturing is the Third Largest Rifle Manufacturer

The results are in and Anderson Manufacturing was the third largest rifle manufacturer in 2016. We sold 453, 763 rifles based on the AR-15 platform during the year. The whole industry enjoyed an increase in sales for 2016 and Anderson Manufacturing was no exception. We had an increase of 51% over 2015!

Including the pistols we sell based on the AR-15 receiver our total firearms sold were 457,429.

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New Anderson Product Alert!

New Anderson Product Alert!

Our newest hand guard is machined from 6061 T6 Aluminum right here in the USA and is M-LOK compatible!

15″ Free Float Hand Guard
Magpul M-LOK attachment System
Continuous Top Picatinny Rail, (sides and bottom are designed to accept M-LOK rails)
Ultra Lightweight
Hard Coat Anodized Finish
T6 Aluminum
Hand guard slides over Barrel Nut and is locked against receiver with three screws

Barrel Nut Thread: 1 ¼”-18
Inside Diameter of Forearm: 1.35 inches
Weight: .9 lbs.

                                                                                      15″ M-LOK Hand Guard Kit

 

 

 

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Use Your Anderson Rifle for a Tax Deduction!

Use Your Anderson Rifle for a Tax Deduction!

You may be able to add “Tax Deduction” to the list of reasons you need more rifles! If you use your Anderson Rifle on a successful hunt and have the trophy mounted, you can donate it to a charity for a tax deduction. The IRS has some rules you’ll need to follow when you make the donation if you want to deduct it. Click on the link to read more about it or talk to your tax person!

Whaling Captains and Taxidermy Property

 

ANDERSON AM15-M4-TAC
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July 4th Sale!

July 4th Sale!

Happy 4th of July America! Click the Picture to check out the Independence Day edition of the Freedom Friday video!  

We’re having a Happy Birthday America Sale! Retail Customers can go to www.andersonmanufacturing.com and use coupon code: america to get 20% off!(Daily Deal not Included).

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Castings vs. Forgings

Castings vs. Forgings

Why does Anderson Manufacturing use forgings instead of castings for our uppers and lowers? Let’s start with a short explanation of the difference between casting and forging.

Anderson lower receivers after anodizing.
Anderson “Don’t Tread On Me” Lower Receiver.

Casting

Casting is the process of heating aluminum or other metal until it is melted and pouring the liquid aluminum into a mold that creates a desired shape. There are three main types of casting: Die Casting, Permanent Mold Casting, and Sand Casting.

Die casting involves forcing the molten aluminum into a die or mold under pressure. Permanent mold casting uses molds with cores of steel or other metal. In sand casting a pattern is pressed into sand to create a mold that is then filled with melted aluminum.

Some of the advantages of casting include:

  • There is no upper limit to the weight of a part you can cast
  • Casting allows the use of a big range of alloys
  • Tooling can be less expensive
  • Small production runs are easy to do

Forging

Forging is the process of applying heat and force to solid billets of aluminum or other metal to put the metal into the desired shape without melting it. The metal is heated in a furnace or fire and

then forged into shape using a hammer or a die. There are several types of forging processes: Impression Die Forging, Cold Forging Open Die Forging, and Rolled Ring Forging.

Impression die forging presses the aluminum between two dies. The dies create the desired shape of the part. This is also called closed die forging and is usually done with hydraulic or mechanical presses, and hammers. These presses and hammers can create up to 50,000 pounds of force.

Some advantages of forging include:

  • Forgings handle impact better than castings
  • Forging eliminates porosity, cavities, and shrinkage
  • A tight grain makes forgings mechanically strong
Left is a lower receiver after forging. Right is a lower receiver forging before forging.
Left is a lower receiver after forging. Right is a lower receiver forging before forging.
Top is a lower forging after machining. Bottom is a lower forging before machining.
Lower receiver forging after machining.

Which is Better For Rifle Parts?

According to a research paper done by the University of Toledo forging is better:

  • Forged parts had a 26% higher tensile strength than the cast parts. This means you can have stronger shackles at a lower part weight.
  • Forged parts have a 37% higher fatigue strength resulting in a factor of six longer fatigue life. This means that a forged shackle is going to last longer.
  • Cast iron only has 66% of the yield strength of forged steel. Yield strength is an indicator of what load a shackle will hold before starting to deform.
  • The forged parts had a 58% reduction in area when pulled to failure. The cast parts only had a 6% reduction in area. That means there would be much greater deformation before failure in a forged part.

This wasn’t a study of gun parts, but the results speak for themselves.

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